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The Ritual of Rights in Japan Law, Society, and Health Policy (Cambridge Studies in Law and Society) by Eric A. Feldman

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Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Constitutional & administrative law,
  • Sociology, Social Studies,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • Law and legislation,
  • Government - Comparative,
  • Patients,
  • Law,
  • Japan,
  • Legal status, laws, etc,
  • General,
  • AIDS (Disease)--Patients--Legal status, laws, etc.--Japan,
  • History / Japan,
  • Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc.,
  • Medical Law & Legislation,
  • AIDS (Disease),
  • Dead bodies (Law),
  • Legal status, laws, etc.

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages233
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7753435M
ISBN 100521779642
ISBN 109780521779647

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Ritual of Rights in Japan: Law, Society, and Health Policy by Feldman, Eric A. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Ritual of Rights in Japan rejects the traditional view that Japan is a nation where overt conflict and the assertion of rights are unacceptable. It examines both mistorical events and contemporary policy, particularly recent battles over AIDS policy and the definition of death--in concluding that rights-based conflict is an important part. The Ritual of Rights in Japan rejects the traditional view that Japan is a nation where overt conflict and the assertion of rights are unacceptable. It examines both historical events and contemporary policy, in concluding that rights-based conflict is an important part of Japanese legal, political, and social practice. The Ritual of Rights in Japan challenges the conventional wisdom that the assertion of rights is fundamentally incompatible with Japanese legal, political and social norms. It discusses the creation of a Japanese translation of the word 'rights', Kenri; examines the historical record for words and concepts similar to 'rights'; and highlights the move towards recognising patients' rights in the.

Get this from a library! The ritual of rights in Japan: law, society, and health policy. [Eric A Feldman] -- The Ritual of Rights in Japan rejects the traditional view that Japan is a nation where overt conflict and the assertion of rights are unacceptable. It examines both historical events and. the ritual of rights in japan: law, society and health policy Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Legal Medicine 22(1) March with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Yet the Japanese continue to practise a variety of religious rituals and ceremonies despite the high-tech, highly regimented nature of Japanese society. Ceremony and Ritual in Japan focuses on the traditional and religious aspects of Japanese society from an anthropological perspective, presenting new material and making cross-cultural comparisons. Japanese people has its unique ritual to welcome children into the world and integrate them into the community. Traditional birth related rituals and customs can be divided into the following components: pre-maternity customs and beliefs; childbirth rites and socialization ceremonies.

Ritual Practice in Modern Japan effectively challenges the widespread assumption that ritual in non-Western societies has little moral significance and that, with modernization, "traditional" practices inevitably disappear. This is a book that will interest scholars and students of cultural anthropology, ritual studies, and Japanese studies.   W hen Japan was forced to “open up” in following more than years of its sakoku policy, the country was a mystery to the outside world. In some ways it still is. But as an early. Ceremony and Ritual in Japan focuses on the traditional and religious aspects of Japanese society from an anthropological perspective, presenting new material and making cross-cultural comparisons. The chapters in this collection cover topics as diverse as funerals and mourning, sweeping, women's roles in ritual, the division of ceremonial. Sexuality in Japan developed separately from that of mainland Asia, as Japan did not adopt the Confucian view of marriage, in which chastity is highly valued. Monogamy in marriage is often thought to be less important in Japan, and sometimes married men may seek pleasure from courtesans. Prostitution in Japan has a long history, and became especially popular during the Japanese .